Journals Of Expeditions Of Discovery Into Central Australia And Overland From Adelaide To King George's Sound In The Years 1840-1: Sent By The Colonists Of South Australia By Eyre, Edward John

























































































































 -  Of
the parent tribe in proportion to the distance traversed, or its isolated
position, with regard to communication with the - Page 810
Journals Of Expeditions Of Discovery Into Central Australia And Overland From Adelaide To King George's Sound In The Years 1840-1: Sent By The Colonists Of South Australia By Eyre, Edward John - Page 810 of 914 - First - Home

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Of The Parent Tribe In Proportion To The Distance Traversed, Or Its Isolated Position, With Regard To Communication With The Tribes Occupying The Main Line Of Route Of Its Original Division; Modified Also, Perhaps, In Some Degree, By The Local Circumstances Of The Country Through Which It May Have Spread.

Commencing with the parent tribe, located as I have supposed, first upon the north-west coast, we find, from

The testimony of Captain Flinders and Dampier, that the male natives of that part of the country, have two front teeth of the upper jaw knocked out at the age of puberty, and that they also undergo the rite of circumcision; but it does not appear that any examination was made with sufficient closeness to ascertain, whether [Note 98: Vide Note 78.] any other ceremony was conjoined with that of circumcision. How far these ceremonies extend along the north-western or western coasts we have no direct evidence, but at Swan River, King George's Sound, and Cape Arid, both customs are completely lost, and for the whole of the distance intervening between these places, and extending fully six hundred miles in straight line along the coast, the same language is so far spoken, that a native of King George's Sound, who accompanied me when travelling from one point to the other, could easily understand, and speak to any natives we met with. This is, however, an unusual case, nor indeed am I aware that there is any other part of Australia where the same dialect continues to be spoken by the Aborigines, with so little variation, for so great a distance, as in the colony of Western Australia.

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