A Lady's Visit To The Gold Diggings Of Australia In 1852-53 By Mrs Charles (Ellen) Clacy




















































































































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Exorbitant they truly are. Not a boat would they put off for the
nearest ship in the bay for less - Page 10
A Lady's Visit To The Gold Diggings Of Australia In 1852-53 By Mrs Charles (Ellen) Clacy - Page 10 of 201 - First - Home

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Exorbitant They Truly Are.

Not a boat would they put off for the nearest ship in the bay for less than a pound, and before I quitted those regions, two and three times that sum was often demanded for only one passenger.

We had just paid at the rate of only three shillings and sixpence each, but this trifling charge was in consideration of the large party - more than a dozen - who had left our ship in the same boat together.

Meanwhile we have entered Liardet's EN ATTENDANT the Melbourne omnibus, some of our number, too impatient to wait longer, had already started on foot. We were shown into a clean, well-furnished sitting-room, with mahogany dining-table and chairs, and a showy glass over the mantelpicce. An English-looking barmaid entered. "Would the company like some wine or spirits?" Some one ordered sherry, of which I only remember that it was vile trash at eight shillings a bottle.

And now the cry of "Here's the bus," brought us quickly outside again, where we found several new arrivals also waiting for it. I had hoped, from the name, or rather misname, of the conveyance, to gladden my eyes with the sight of something civilized. Alas, for my disappointment! There stood a long, tumble-to-pieces-looking waggon, not covered in, with a plank down each side to sit upon, and a miserable narrow plank it was. Into this vehicle were crammed a dozen people and an innumerable host of portmanteaus, large and small, carpet-bags, baskets, brown-paper parcels, bird-cage and inmate, &c., all of which, as is generally the case, were packed in a manner the most calculated to contribute the largest amount of inconvenience to the live portion of the cargo.

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