A General History And Collection Of Voyages And Travels - Volume 6 - By Robert Kerr













































































































 -  I wish I were he!
The victory was now complete, and the viceroy and all the captains
assailed the smaller - Page 190
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I Wish I Were He!" The Victory Was Now Complete, And The Viceroy And All The Captains Assailed The Smaller Vessels, Whose Crews Endeavoured To Escape By Swimming; But The Gallies And Boats Of The Portuguese Being Sent Among Them, Killed Such Numbers That The Sea Was Dyed In Blood.

In this great battle, the enemy lost above 1500 men, and the Portuguese only 40.

Vast riches were acquired by plunder in the captured vessels; and by the great variety of books which were found in different languages, it was concluded that the crews were made up of various nations. Some of these books were in Latin, some in Italian, and others in Portuguese.[107] The colours of the Soldan and of his admiral Mir Husseyn were taken, and afterwards sent to the king of Portugal. Of all the vessels taken in this glorious and decisive victory, four ships and two gallies only were preserved, all the rest being ordered to be burnt by Almeyda. This great victory would have much more redounded to the honour of the Portuguese arms, had not the conquered been treated with barbarous cruelty: owing to which, many persons very reasonably considered the unhappy end of Almeyda and other gentlemen, as a just punishment for their crimes on this occasion.[108]

[Footnote 107: It is hardly necessary to observe that these books belonged in all probability to Christian galley slaves serving under the Mamelukes. - E.]

[Footnote 108: Though not called upon to vindicate the conduct of Albuquerque and the Portuguese on this occasion; it may be noticed that the almost interminable war which subsisted for many centuries between the Christians and Moors of the Peninsula, and after the expulsion of the latter, with the states of Barbary; joined to the hellish Inquisition on the one side, and the most degrading slavery inflicted on both by their enemies, long nourished the most rancorous spirit of enmity and hatred, now farther exalted by commercial rivalship.

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