A Week On The Concord And Merrimack Rivers By Henry David Thoreau




















































































































































 -   I would rather be a dog, and bay the moon, than many
a Roman that I know.  The night is - Page 40
A Week On The Concord And Merrimack Rivers By Henry David Thoreau - Page 40 of 422 - First - Home

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"I Would Rather Be A Dog, And Bay The Moon," Than Many A Roman That I Know.

The night is equally indebted to the clarion of the cock, with wakeful hope, from the very setting of the sun, prematurely ushering in the dawn.

All these sounds, the crowing of cocks, the baying of dogs, and the hum of insects at noon, are the evidence of nature's health or _sound_ state. Such is the never-failing beauty and accuracy of language, the most perfect art in the world; the chisel of a thousand years retouches it.

At length the antepenultimate and drowsy hours drew on, and all sounds were denied entrance to our ears.

Who sleeps by day and walks by night, Will meet no spirit but some sprite.

-

SUNDAY.

"The river calmly flows, Through shining banks, through lonely glen, Where the owl shrieks, though ne'er the cheer of men Has stirred its mute repose, Still if you should walk there, you would go there again." ^CHANNING.^

-

"The Indians tell us of a beautiful River lying far to the south, which they call Merrimack."

^Sieur de Monts^, _Relations of the jesuits_, 1604.

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SUNDAY.

- * -

In the morning the river and adjacent country were covered with a dense fog, through which the smoke of our fire curled up like a still subtiler mist; but before we had rowed many rods, the sun arose and the fog rapidly dispersed, leaving a slight steam only to curl along the surface of the water. It was a quiet Sunday morning, with more of the auroral rosy and white than of the yellow light in it, as if it dated from earlier than the fall of man, and still preserved a heathenish integrity:

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