Letters From An American Farmer By Hector St. John De Crevecoeur



















































































































































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Yes, I will cheerfully embrace that resource, it is an holy
inspiration; by night and by day, it presents itself - Page 270
Letters From An American Farmer By Hector St. John De Crevecoeur - Page 270 of 291 - First - Home

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Yes, I Will Cheerfully Embrace That Resource, It Is An Holy Inspiration; By Night And By Day, It Presents Itself To My Mind:

I have carefully revolved the scheme; I have considered in all its future effects and tendencies, the new mode

Of living we must pursue, without salt, without spices, without linen and with little other clothing; the art of hunting, we must acquire, the new manners we must adopt, the new language we must speak; the dangers attending the education of my children we must endure. These changes may appear more terrific at a distance perhaps than when grown familiar by practice: what is it to us, whether we eat well made pastry, or pounded alagriches; well roasted beef, or smoked venison; cabbages, or squashes? Whether we wear neat home-spun or good beaver; whether we sleep on feather-beds, or on bear-skins? The difference is not worth attending to. The difficulty of the language, fear of some great intoxication among the Indians; finally, the apprehension lest my younger children should be caught by that singular charm, so dangerous at their tender years; are the only considerations that startle me. By what power does it come to pass, that children who have been adopted when young among these people, can never be prevailed on to readopt European manners? Many an anxious parent I have seen last war, who at the return of the peace, went to the Indian villages where they knew their children had been carried in captivity; when to their inexpressible sorrow, they found them so perfectly Indianised, that many knew them no longer, and those whose more advanced ages permitted them to recollect their fathers and mothers, absolutely refused to follow them, and ran to their adopted parents for protection against the effusions of love their unhappy real parents lavished on them!

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