Letters From An American Farmer By Hector St. John De Crevecoeur



















































































































































 -  This has been from the beginning, and is to this day, the
principal seminary of the Indians; they live on - Page 160
Letters From An American Farmer By Hector St. John De Crevecoeur - Page 160 of 291 - First - Home

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This Has Been From The Beginning, And Is To This Day, The Principal Seminary Of The Indians; They Live On That Part Of The Island Which Is Called Chapoquidick, And Were Very Early Christianised By The Respectable Family Of The Mahews, The First Proprietors Of It.

The first settler of that name conveyed by will to a favourite daughter a certain part of it, on which there grew many wild vines; thence it was called Martha's Vineyard, after her name, which in process of time extended to the whole island.

The posterity of the ancient Aborigines remain here to this day, on lands which their forefathers reserved for themselves, and which are religiously kept from any encroachments. The New England people are remarkable for the honesty with which they have fulfilled, all over that province, those ancient covenants which in many others have been disregarded, to the scandal of those governments. The Indians there appeared, by the decency of their manners, their industry, and neatness, to be wholly Europeans, and nowise inferior to many of the inhabitants. Like them they are sober, laborious, and religious, which are the principal characteristics of the four New England provinces. They often go, like the young men of the Vineyard, to Nantucket, and hire themselves for whalemen or fishermen; and indeed their skill and dexterity in all sea affairs is nothing inferior to that of the whites. The latter are divided into two classes, the first occupy the land, which they till with admirable care and knowledge; the second, who are possessed of none, apply themselves to the sea, the general resource of mankind in this part of the world.

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