The Englishwoman In America By Isabella Lucy Bird
























































































































 -  Thus, on their arrival
at the Bend, the delinquents found that, besides being both censured and
laughed at for their - Page 70
The Englishwoman In America By Isabella Lucy Bird - Page 70 of 478 - First - Home

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Thus, On Their Arrival At The Bend, The Delinquents Found That, Besides Being Both Censured And Laughed At For Their Selfishness, They Had Lost Their Places, Their Dinners, And Their Tempers.

As we were rowing to shore, the captain told us that our worst difficulty was yet to come - an insuperable one, he added, to corpulent persons.

There was no landing-place for boats, or indeed for anything, at low water, and we had to climb up a wharf ten feet high, formed of huge round logs placed a foot apart from each other, and slippery with sea-grass. It is really incredible that, at a place through which a considerable traffic passes, as being on the high road from Prince Edward Island to the United States, there should be a more inconvenient landing-place than I ever saw at a Highland village.

Large, high, springless waggons were waiting for us on this wharf, which, after jolting us along a bad road for some distance, deposited us at the door of the inn at Shediac, where we came for the first time upon the track of the cholera, which had recently devastated all the places along our route. Here we had a substantial dinner of a very homely description, and, as in Nova Scotia, a cup of tea sweetened with molasses was placed by each plate, instead of any intoxicating beverage.

After this meal I went into the "house-room," or parlour, a general "rendezvous" of lady visitors, babies, unmannerly children, Irish servant- girls with tangled hair and bare feet, colonial gossips, "cute" urchins, and not unfrequently of those curious-looking beings, pauper-emigrant lads from Erin, who do a little of everything and nothing well, denominated stable-helps.

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