A Popular Account Of Dr. Livingstone's Expedition To The Zambesi By David Livingston
































































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makes me doubly anxious to render my narrative acceptable to all my
readers; but, in the absence of - Page 5
A Popular Account Of Dr. Livingstone's Expedition To The Zambesi By David Livingston - Page 5 of 505 - First - Home

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This Knowledge Makes Me Doubly Anxious To Render My Narrative Acceptable To All My Readers; But, In The Absence Of

Any excellence in literary composition, the natural consequence of my pursuits, I have to offer only a simple account of

A mission which, with respect to the objects proposed to be thereby accomplished, formed a noble contrast to some of the earlier expeditions to Eastern Africa. I believe that the information it will give, respecting the people visited and the countries traversed, will not be materially gainsaid by any future commonplace traveller like myself, who may be blest with fair health and a gleam of sunshine in his breast. This account is written in the earnest hope that it may contribute to that information which will yet cause the great and fertile continent of Africa to be no longer kept wantonly sealed, but made available as the scene of European enterprise, and will enable its people to take a place among the nations of the earth, thus securing the happiness and prosperity of tribes now sunk in barbarism or debased by slavery; and, above all, I cherish the hope that it may lead to the introduction of the blessings of the Gospel.

In order that the following narrative may be clearly understood, it is necessary to call to mind some things which took place previous to the Zambesi Expedition being sent out. Most geographers are aware that, before the discovery of Lake Ngami and the well-watered country in which the Makololo dwell, the idea prevailed that a large part of the interior of Africa consisted of sandy deserts, into which rivers ran and were lost.

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